Fukushima disaster and the West Coast

When I was growing up, there was a free press in the United States and Russia was full of propaganda stories.   Now it seems that we have to follow the Russian stories to find out what the Japanese disaster in Fukushima has done to the United States.   In a story in Russian Times .   They report a story in the Open Journal of Pediatrics that:

Various reports indicate that the incidence of congenital hypothyroidism is increasing in developed nations, and that improved detection and more inclusive criteria for the disease do not explain this trend entirely. One risk factor documented in numerous studies is exposure to radioactive iodine found in nuclear weapons test fallout and nuclear reactor emissions. Large amounts of fallout disseminated worldwide from the meltdowns in four reactors at the Fukushima-Dai-ichi plant in Japan beginning March 11, 2011 included  radioisotopes. Just days after the meltdowns, I-131 concentrations in US precipitation was measured up to 211 times above normal. Highest levels of I-131 and airborne gross beta were documented in the five US States on the Pacific Ocean. The number of congenital hypothyroid cases in these five states from March 17-December 31, 2011 was 16% greater than for the same period in 2010, compared to a 3% decline in 36 other US States (p < 0.03). The greatest divergence in these two groups (+28%) occurred in the period March 17-June 30 (p < 0.04). Further analysis, in the US and in other nations, is needed to better understand any association between iodine exposure from Fukushima-Dai-ichi and congenital hypothyroidism risk.

There seems to be a deafening sound coming from the main stream media about this public health care disaster.

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One thought on “Fukushima disaster and the West Coast

  1. Pingback: Sea lion update, June 11, 2013 | Vernon Radiation Safety

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